THE BENEVOLENT MESSIAH !!!

Jesus also referred to as Jesus of Nazareth, is the central figure of Christianity who the teachings of most Christian denominations hold to be the Son of God Christianity regards Jesus as the awaited Messiah of the Old Testament and refers to him as Jesus Christ.

Most scholars agree that Jesus was a Jewish teacher or rabbi from Galilee who preached his message orally, was baptized by John the Baptist.  which often depict him as having one or more of the following roles: the leader of an apocalyptic  movement, Messiah, a charismatic healer, a sage and philosopher, or an egalitarian social reformer.

He is referred to as “the son of Mary and brother of James and Joses and Judas and Simon”. The name Jesus, as found in several modern languages, is derived from the Latin Iesus, a transliteration of the Greek Ἰησοῦς (Iesous). The Greek form is a rendition of the Aramic ישוע‎ (Yeshua), which is derived from the Hebrew יהושע‎ (Yehoshua). The name Yeshua appears to have been in use in Judea at the time of the birth of Jesus.

BIRTH

Most scholars agree that Jesus was a Galilean Jew, born around the beginning of the first century, The gospels offer several clues concerning the year of Jesus’ birth.Matthew 2:1 associates the birth of Jesus with the reign of Herod the Great, who died around 4 BC, and Luke1:5 mentions that Herod was on the throne shortly before the birth of Jesus.

GENEALOGY & NATIVITY

Accounts of the Nativity of Jesus appear in the New Testament only in the gospels of Luke and Matthew. Outside the New Testament, documents exist that are more or less contemporary with Jesus and the gospels, but few shed any light on biographical details of his life.

Matthew begins his gospel with the genealogy of Jesus, before giving an account of Jesus’ birth. He traces Jesus’ ancestry to Abraham through David. Luke 3:22 discusses the genealogy after describing the baptism of Jesus, when the voice from Heaven addresses Jesus and identifies him as the Son of God.

The Nativity is a prominent element in the Gospel of Luke, comprising over 10 percent of the text and being three times as long as Matthew’s Nativity text. Luke’s account emphasizes events before the birth of Jesus and centers on Mary, while Matthew’s mostly covers those after the birth and centers on Joseph. Both accounts state that Jesus was born to Joseph and Mary, his betrothed, in Bethlehem, and both support the doctrine of the virgin birth, according to which Jesus was miraculously conceived by the Holy Spirit in Mary’s womb when she was still a virgin.

BAPTISM

In the gospels, In Matthew 3:14, on meeting Jesus, the Baptist says “I need to be baptized by you”, but Jesus persuades John to baptize him nonetheless.  After he does so andJesus emerges from the water, the sky opens and a voice from Heaven states, “This is my Son, the Beloved, with whom I am well pleased” (Matthew 3:17). The Holy Spirit then descends upon Jesus as a dove.

PUBLIC MINISTRY

The gospels present John the Baptist’s ministry as the precursor of that of Jesus. Starting with his baptism, Jesus begins his ministry in the countryside of Judea, near the River Jordan, He then travels, preaches and performs miracles, eventually completing his ministry with the Last Supper with his disciples in Jerusalem. Near the beginning of his ministry, Jesus appoints twelve apostles.

Scholars divide the ministry of Jesus into several stages. The Galilean ministry begins when Jesus returns to Galilee from the Judean Desert after rebuffing the temptation of Satan. Jesus preaches around Galilee, and in Matthew 4:18-20, his first disciples, who will eventually form the core of the early Church, encounter him and begin to travel with him.

MIRACLES

In the gospel accounts, Jesus devotes a large portion of his ministry performing miracles, especially healings. The four accounts together record about 35 or 36 miracles. The miracles can be classified into two main categories: healing miracles and nature miracles. The healing miracles include cures for physical ailments, exorcisms, and resurrections of the dead. The nature miracles show Jesus’ power over nature, and include turning water into wine, walking on water, and calming a storm, among others. Jesus states that his miracles are from a divine source. When Jesus’ opponents accuse him of performing exorcisms by the power of Beelzebub, the prince of demonsJesus counters that he performs them by the “Spirit of God” (Matthew 12:28) or “finger of God” (Luke 11:20).

One characteristic shared among all miracles of Jesus in the gospel accounts is that he performed them freely and never requested or accepted any form of payment. The gospel episodes that include descriptions of the miracles of Jesus also often include teachings, and the miracles themselves involve an element of teaching.

THE LAST SUPPER

The Last Supper is the final meal that Jesus shares with his twelve apostles in Jerusalem before his crucifixion. The Last Supper is mentioned in all four canonical gospels, and Paul’s First Epistle of Corinthians (11:23–26) also refers to it. During the meal, Jesus predicts that one of his apostles will betray him. Despite each Apostle’s assertion that he would not betray him, Jesus reiterates that the betrayer would be one of those present.

In the Synoptics, Jesus takes bread, breaks it and gives it to the disciples, saying, “This is my body, which is given for you”. He then has them all drink from a cup, saying, “This cup that is poured out for you is the new covenant in my blood”.

 

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